Just for a bike SwiftKey founder sold his share of £170m Microsoft app

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Hill-Scott who is the founder of “ SwiftKey ” tweeted on Tuesday that the preference to sell was “the major mistake I ever made” he posted this before

Hill-Scott who is the founder of “ SwiftKey ” tweeted on Tuesday that the preference to sell was “the major mistake I ever made” he posted this before setting his Twitter account to private.

The documents of Companies House demonstrate that Hill-Scott was selected director of TouchType Ltd; the parent company of SwiftKey’s on August 13, 2008, but resigned and leaves the job two months later on October 24.

The Times reported that Hill-Scott was disappointed with the long timings and low pay related to a start-up.

Hill-Scott, the civil servant, founded a startup named SwiftKey in 2008 having an age of 29 with two friends, Jon Reynolds, 30, and Ben Medlock, 26, that just traded to Microsoft for £174 million.

He is reported to have just taken a bicycle as recompense for his shares when he was gone. Those shares are currently reported to be worth approximately £25 million after the dealing was sold to Microsoft for £170 million.

Hill-Scott tweeted on Tuesday that the decision to sell was “the biggest mistake I ever made” before setting his account to private. The Independent has contacted him for comment.

Hill-Scott left the business on good terms with his friends. A spokesperson from SwiftKey notified to the Times.

Medlock and Reynolds are about turn out to be millionaires after SwiftKey, an analytical text service was purchased by Microsoft.

SwiftKey makes use of “artificial intelligence” by studying a user’s script patterns over time, to better forecast the words they might use next. This technological skill has been used by Stephen Hawking to boost up his computer-generated voice and has been installed on approximately 300 million tablets all around the world.

Hill-Scott turns out to be a photographer, taking exploit shots for BMX magazines, prior to joining the civil service to perk up the Government’s employ of technology.

 

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