Wi-Fi 7 has reached 5Gbps speed five times more efficient than your current router

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Wi-Fi 7 has reached 5Gbps speed five times more efficient than your current router

As per PC Gamer, Intel and Broadcom collaborated in the development of a Wi-Fi 7 test to prepare for its expected approval in 2023.

The two companies presented the new connectivity standards that are coming and successfully demonstrated 5Gbps speeds when connected to an Intel laptop as well as an Broadcom connection point.

They are 5 times more efficient than Wi-Fi 6, and 2.5 times more efficient that Wi-Fi6E. The speeds have the potential to increase speed when Wi-Fi 7 is developed as an ecosystem, according to the journal.

Prior to its certification Wi-Fi was at an advanced stage of development as evidenced in the video demonstration.

Although Wi-Fi 6 and Wi-Fi 6E are not currently in any market dominance however, the move to Wi-Fi 7 offers lots of potential for both the companies that invented the standard, including Intel and Broadcom and the users and businesses that will use it.

One of the main reasons for this include Wi-Fi’s lower latency as well as its ability to connect simultaneously to multiple high-resolution video streams over one network, along and Intel and Broadcom’s expectation that it will be able to perform when combined with AR or VR services. These are just a few of the main reasons.

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With less congestion on the network expected this standard is likely to be well-liked by gamers.

Wi-Fi 7 is expected to be fully certified by the mid-year of 2023 and products that are that are certified to work with the standards coming to stores during the second half of this year.

Based on Intel and Broadcom the Wi-Fi 7 devices will be backwards compatible with earlier connectivity protocols, such as Wi-Fi 6 and.

Although the Wi-Fi 7 demo looks promising, the launch and rollout decide its success. Like Wi-Fi 6E with a lack of options on the market could cause the standard’s performance to be sluggish.

Based on PC Gamer, the standard is likely to first appear on top-of-the-line laptops, motherboards as well as smartphones, later following by access points and routers.

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